In a survival situation, you’re not going to be eating bacon-wrapped filet mignon, or at least not for long. Once the food supplies in your fridge, freezer, pantry, and garden begin to dwindle, you’ll need to supplement them with other food sources. This can mean foraging for wild edibles, fishing, trapping, and/or hunting, but each potential food source must be weighed and considered carefully.

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When you’re trying to stave off starvation, expending all your time and energy on bringing home a big game animal and failing could be disastrous. This is where more plentiful — and potentially less appetizing — food sources come in. Insects are one such food source, and have been used for millennia by cultures around the world. Many cultures still eat bugs on a regular basis today.

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We’ve previously touched on the benefits of eating insects, but haven’t really delved into the nutritional value of bugs. You can probably guess that they’re high in fiber, but you might be surprised that they’re also full of calcium, iron, protein, and even relatively high in fat. The following series of infographics from Insight Pest Solutions shows the nutritional value of insects, primarily crickets.

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